National to decide on deputy leadership today after Gerry Brownlee resigns from the role

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The National Party will decide on a new deputy leader at a diminished caucus meeting after the resignation of Gerry Brownlee.

Brownlee left the position on Friday, when the final outcome of the 2020 election showed National lost a further two MPs and three electorates after the counting of more than 500,000 special votes.

National Party deputy leader and campaign chairman Gerry Brownlee resigned from the deputy leadership job on Friday.

Iain McGregor/Stuff

National Party deputy leader and campaign chairman Gerry Brownlee resigned from the deputy leadership job on Friday.

The party’s caucus will meet on Tuesday morning to determine a new deputy leader. A confidence vote will be held on Judith Collin’s leadership, however she has been expected to retain the support of the caucus.

National’s health spokesman, Dr Shane Reti, has been touted as the frontrunner for the deputy job. Michael Woodhouse has also considered running for the job, among other senior MPs.

READ MORE:
* Election 2020: Michael Woodhouse weighing up whether to run for National deputy leader
* Election 2020: Gerry Brownlee to step down as National deputy leader
* Gerry Brownlee’s deputy leadership in trouble ahead of confidence vote

STUFF

Judith Collins and Gerry Brownlee earlier talked about the deputy leadership of the party with reporters. Brownlee later resigned from the role.

Brownlee, when resigning on Friday, he said he would be stepping away from the deputy role to focus more on rebuilding the National Party in his home patch of Christchurch.

“In July I stepped into the role of deputy leader of the National Party to support Judith as our leader. It’s my strong view that Judith campaigned extremely well in what was an unprecedented election.

“While I was proud to step in at the time, and remain so, I’ve always believed that influence is more important than position when it comes to politics.”



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