Faroe Islands set to open undersea tunnel network with roundabout

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The tunnel network will reduce the daily commutes for thousands of Faroe Islands residents.

Olavur Frederiksen/Estunlar.fo/Facebook

The tunnel network will reduce the daily commutes for thousands of Faroe Islands residents.

The Faroe Islands are set to open an undersea tunnel network that will reduce the drive time between the capital Torshavn to Runavik from 64 minutes to 16 minutes.

Underwater tunnels between the islands of Streymoy and Eysturoy are connected by a roundabout in a network about 11 kilometres long.

The Eysturoy tunnel has been under construction since 2017.

Ólavur Frederiksen/Estunlar.fo/Facebook

The Eysturoy tunnel has been under construction since 2017.

Set to open on December 19 after more than three years of construction, the tunnel network project is expected to reduce the daily commute time for several thousand people by up to an hour and a half, the company behind it said.

“Half of all inhabitants of the Faroe Islands will live in an area where driving distance is insignificant and services will become available where previously the population foundation was too low.”

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For safety reasons, no incline in the tunnel has a gradient of more than five per cent, and the lowest point is 187 metres below sea level.

The roundabout will contain sculptures and light effects by local artist Trondur Patursson, the BBC reported.

Drivers will need to pay a toll to use the tunnels.

Olavur Frederiksen/Estunlar.fo/Facebook

Drivers will need to pay a toll to use the tunnels.

The tunnel network forms part of the largest ever infrastructure expansion project in the Faroe Islands, according to contractors NCC.

Passenger cars will be charged 75 Danish krona (NZ$17) one way to use the tunnels if they pay a yearly subscription of 200 krona (NZ$46), local news website Local.fo reported. The toll will be more expensive for those without a subscription.

The roundabout will feature works by local artist Trondur Patursson.

Olavur Frederiksen/Estunlar.fo/Facebook

The roundabout will feature works by local artist Trondur Patursson.

A 10.6km tunnel connecting the islands of Sandoy and Streymoy is expected to be completed in 2023.

A self-governing region of Denmark, the 18 volcanic Faroe Islands are tucked between Iceland and Norway in the North Atlantic Ocean.

The lowest point of the Eysturoy tunnel is 187 metres below sea level.

Olavur Frederiksen/Estunlar.Fo/Facebook

The lowest point of the Eysturoy tunnel is 187 metres below sea level.



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