ADNZ Waikato awards recognise ‘DOC hut’ renovation and fortress-like new build

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Cook Street Residence, a Hamilton renovation project by Dean Baldock of The Architecture People, has won a major Waikato ADNZ award.

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Cook Street Residence, a Hamilton renovation project by Dean Baldock of The Architecture People, has won a major Waikato ADNZ award.

A Hamilton renovation for first-home owners that featured on Stuff earlier this year is one of two Waikato projects recognised in the 2020 Regional ADNZ Resene Architectural Design Awards.

The Cook Street Residence project, designed by Dean Baldock of The Architecture People, has transformed a small house that was likened to a DOC hut. It won the Waikato Resene Colour in Design Award and received a Commended Award in the Residential Alterations and Additions category.

At the time, owners Kristin and Alexander said there was a simplicity about it they liked: “There were no soffits or eaves, and we liked the tight, simple geometry. We wanted a house where we could add value and this was a bit of a blank canvas”.

BEFORE: The house looked not unlike a DOC hut.

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BEFORE: The house looked not unlike a DOC hut.

Baldock said the house was a “bit of a rabbit warren” inside, with a separate kitchen. “None of the spaces really talked to each other. When you made your dinner you would have to walk it down a hallway, through an unusable open area by the front door, then down another hallway to the lounge at the other end of the house.”

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His solution involved gutting the entire interior, moving walls and repurposing the spaces. All the wall linings came down, which made it easy to introduce insulation to the walls. The kitchen was moved from the south of the house to the large, light-filled, open-plan family area that opens to a large, covered deck.

The board-and-batten cladding was retained, but painted in Resene Double Foundry, white white trim.

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The board-and-batten cladding was retained, but painted in Resene Double Foundry, white white trim.

And the dark charcoal blue-painted exterior (Resene Double Foundry) is just as much a transformation as the interior, even though the ply-and-batten-style cladding remains.

“We had a mutual idea that the house should go darker,” Baldock says. “The (new) colour instantly made it look better – it elevated it to something more contemporary.”

All the joinery was replaced with dark joinery and double glazing, and is framed with white to provide a strong contrast to the black. A new garage was built and painted to match the house.

ADNZ judges said the project is testament to what can be achieved through good design process and a big vision. The work is a great example of contemporary depths, smooth contrasts and industrial decor working together to create a space that is approachable and inviting.”

KARAPIRO LAKE HOUSE ‘ALL ABOUT THE ENTRY’

Lee Turner, of Turner Road Architecture took out the award for best Residential New Home Over 300m2 with a large, contemporary house overlooking Lake Karapiro.

Karapiro Lake House, designed by Lee Turner of Turner Road Architecture, won the ADNZ Waikato award for the best Residential New Home Over 300m2.

AMANDA AITKEN

Karapiro Lake House, designed by Lee Turner of Turner Road Architecture, won the ADNZ Waikato award for the best Residential New Home Over 300m2.

Karapiro Lake House is a lean, low-profile home that sprawls above the lake in the foothills of Maungatautari Mountain in Cambridge.

Turner says the house was designed to provide a peaceful, tranquil lifestyle on the shores of the lake, with the owners wanting a home that was sympathetic to its surroundings.

“Our clients were moving from the big smoke to enjoy a more peaceful life on the lake, so the design brief was centred on their desire for an easy living, tranquil dwelling that embraced the dramatic water views.

“They were looking for a simplistic, contemporary shape, but wanted the building to be sympathetic to its scenic surrounds.

“The resulting long, low-slung home was constructed with raw textures and materials (including bandsawn cedar and textured concrete tilt-slab walls), and a palette of colours drawn from nature, to reflect the hillside backdrop and provide minimal visual disruption to its lakeside environment.”

ADNZ judges said the drama of the home is all in the entry elevation.

White walls and furniture visually soften the interior of the Karapiro Lake House.

AMANDA AITKEN

White walls and furniture visually soften the interior of the Karapiro Lake House.

“The entry is a long wall of heavy fair-faced precast concrete panels, broken by a horizontal band of glazing and band-sawn cedar slats, and punctured by a filigree steel gate that allows glimpses into the patio behind.

“The effect is of a beautifully proportioned fortress, with a narrow slot to observe those arriving. The front door is positioned between this main facade and a parallel concrete wall.

“The ‘fortified’ effect is intensified by the entry, which requires slipping in sideways between these two walls.”

Sustainable design features include passive heating and cooling measures, highly insulated concrete floors, walls and ceilings, double-glazed, argon-filled joinery and passive ventilation.

ADNZ

The ADNZ’s national award winners for 2019 can be seen in this video. The Supreme Award winner was a small, two-bedroom family home in Gisborne.



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